Category: Hydrostatic Transmissions

Hydrostatic Drive for Sweet Sorghum Harvester

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An experimental vehicle to harvest whole-stalk sweet sorghum was designed by a university research team. At present, the harvester is a pull-type machine, meaning it is towed behind a tractor and powered via a universal joint driveline. The decision has been made to convert the harvester to a self-propelled machine. The configuration chosen is a …

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Manually Operated Servo Pump

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Manually Operated Servo Pump

Before beginning our discussion of closed-loop hydrostatic transmissions, it is necessary to first learn how a servo-controlled pump operates. A variable displacement axial piston pump will be used as an illustration. When configured for servo control, this pump will have a control piston mounted in the pump housing. When the control piston extends, it moves …

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Vehicle with Two Hydrostatic Transmissions

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Vehicle with Two Hydrostatic Transmissions

The vehicle shown in Fig. 6.14 has a separate in-line hydrostatic transmission for each drive wheel. The engine delivers power via a universal joint driveline to a right-angle drive gearbox. Each side of this gearbox powers an inline hydrostatic transmission. The wheel is connected to the hydraulic motor. A final drive may or may not …

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Two Wheel Motors Hydrostatic Transmission

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Two Wheel Motors Hydrostatic Transmission

Wheel motors, mounted at both rear wheels (Fig. 6.12), is a variation of the configuration shown in Fig. 6.11. This arrangement eliminates the universal joint driveline, differential, and rear axle, with resultant cost and weight savings. Because the pump has low inertia, it is often possible to provide enough starting torque to start the engine …

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Hydrostatic Transmissions Advantages

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A hydrostatic transmission provides improved maneuverability, but at a cost. The efficiency of a hydrostatic transmission is always lower than a discrete-gear transmission. A discrete-gear transmission will typically have an efficiency of 95% or greater, meaning that 95% of the input energy is delivered to the load (wheels). A hydrostatic transmission has an efficiency of …

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